Image Processing Reference
In-Depth Information
Figure6.11MultiwavelengthMilkyWayimages
image. Finer details of the galactic center are visible because of this increased
resolution. This image is courtesy of A.R. Duncan.
The fourth image shows emission from cold carbon monoxide. The wavelength
of the emission is at a wavelength of 2.6 mm (the millimeter-wave band). Carbon
monoxide is associated with molecular hydrogen that is difficult to observe directly.
Molecular hydrogen is interesting to astronomers because large clouds of it are the
precursors to star formation. This image is courtesy of T.M. Dame.
The fifth image shows emission at 12, 60, and 100minfrared wavelengths,
which are indicated by blue, green, and red false color respectively. It is mostly
thermal emission from interstellar dust warmed by the absorption of starlight. This
image is courtesy of the Astrophysics Data Facility, NASA Goddard Space Flight
Center.
The sixth image is also infrared, and shows mostly thermal emission from cool,
low-mass stars throughout the galactic plane. The wavelengths indicated by blue,
green, and red pseudocolor are 1.25, 2.2, and 3.5mrespectively. The center
bulge of the Milky Way is very clearly visible, since infrared light passes easily
through the interstellar dust that blocks visible light. This image is courtesy of the
Astrophysics Data Facility, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center.
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