HTML and CSS Reference
In-Depth Information
people's favorite jQuery features. It is perhaps most famous for a library of effects built
using prototype, called Scriptaculous. Scriptaculous is a collection of animations you can
apply to animate elements on web pages. No longer did items you removed from the
page just blink out of existence; they could shrink, or fade away, or explode. Similar
libraries of effects have since been written for other libraries, but Scriptaculous showed
the world what could be accomplished in terms of visual effects using only JavaScript
and CSS. You can get Prototype at http://www.prototypejs.org/, and you can check out
Scriptaculous at http://script.aculo.us/.
Other Libraries
There are a number of other JavaScript libraries, too. Here's a list of a few others you
may encounter, or want to check out:
Google Web Toolkit —Enables you to create JavaScript applications using Java
and compile them into JavaScript (http://code.google.com/webtoolkit/)
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Midori —Optimized for quick download (http://www.midorijs.com/)
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MochiKit —Focused on stability and documentation ( http://www.mochikit.com/)
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MooTools —One of the most mature frameworks, optimized for size
( http://mootools.net/)
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Getting Started with jQuery
Entire books are published about each of the popular JavaScript libraries, so it would be
foolish to try to cover them all in this lesson. Instead, I'm going to focus on introducing
jQuery. I've chosen it mainly because it's the easiest library to get started with, especially
if you already know CSS. Even if you don't wind up using jQuery, you'll still get an idea
of how JavaScript libraries work by reading this section. You'll just have to follow up by
digging into the documentation to learn how to apply the same concepts with the library
that you use instead.
jQuery is a regular JavaScript file that you can include in your page using the <script>
tag. To get started, download your own copy at http://jquery.com. After you've down-
loaded jQuery, you can start using it in your pages. The easiest way to included in a
page, especially for local testing, is to rename the downloaded file to jquery.js and put
it in the same directory as the HTML page:
<script type=”text/javascript” src=”jquery.js”></script>
 
 
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